Tag Archives: healthy food

What is Intermittent fasting?

Intermittent Fasting

We all love food, which makes weight loss a challenge. What if you can eat the foods you love and just skip a meal? That sounds like a fantastic deal and that’s what people often assume intermittent fasting is all about. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Skipping breakfast isn’t the defining feature of any diet. Like all diets, it’s about self-control. So what really is intermittent fasting?

Intermittent fasting or time-restricted fasting is, at its core, eating at specific times and refraining from eating during others. It limits the number of calories you take every day, giving you the ability to maintain your calorie intake without changing what you eat. The goal is to set an eating window that’s between 6 to 12 hours a day. For example, if you’re going by the “skip breakfast” route, your eating window might be between 11 A.M. and 10 P.M. 

Intermittent fasting: Does it work, and is it safe? | OSF HealthCare

But the hard part is, you have to train yourself. When you set your eating window, you have to stick to it. Cheat days don’t really apply to this diet like the rest. In a way, you’re training your metabolism. This diet does require physical activity. That means you need to exercise between one of the meals in your eating window. Go on a nice walk or hit the gym when possible to get the most out of your intermittent fasting experience.

Beyond exercise, there’s one more “catch.” Ideally, you should avoid sugary foods and drinks. More importantly, you need to stay hydrated. One should always stay hydrated, but in this case, you should increase your water intake if you’re exercising in order to replenish your fluids. And while this diet gives you the ability to eat what you want, that’s not 100% true. It requires you to add more fiber and protein to your meals as well. Protein, for one, is a must when you’re exercising. But when paired with fiber, which in itself is fantastic for your GI tract, it makes you feel fuller for longer. When you’re not eating for hours on end, you’re going to want that full feeling to keep from breaking your dieting window.

Let’s recap.

DO:

  • Exercise
  • Set and stick to an eating window
  • Stay hydrated 
  • Eat more fiber and protein

DON’T

  • Eat outside your set window
  • Drink or eat sugary things
  • Be inactive

What do you think about intermittent fasting now? It’s far from the skip breakfast misconception most believe it to be. But in all reality, this is a great diet for losing weight healthily. It just requires a lot of self-control. If this diet doesn’t sound like a fit for you, check out our article on the Mediterranean diet. It may be a better fit for you, especially if you’re a fish-lover. And if you struggle to eat healthily, or just aren’t a fan of meal prep, don’t forget we make and deliver meals and snacks tailored to fit individual dietary needs. Click here to learn more.

Sources:

jamesclear.com

medicalnewstoday.com

Why the Mediterranean Diet?

Mediterranean food

Dieting fads come and go. But that’s the thing is, they’re just fad. Not necessarily fit to stick around long term. Remember when the juice cleanse was all the rage? Or when everyone suddenly went gluten-free? The reality is, fads fade. However, some diets are less social media crazy and more scientifically, and even historically, backed. What diet might that be? The Mediterranean diet.

All it is 

  • Vegetables, fruits, healthy fats and, whole grains 
  • Fish, poultry, beans, and eggs
  • Limited red meat and dairy 

Simple right? Very reasonable. It’s a doable diet that doesn’t ask too much. If anything, you’ll just have to cut down on the portions and hold back on the cheese. Maybe a nice steak now and then. But how could it be so mundane yet still be called a diet? It’s in the name. This diet has been eaten for as long as people have lived in the Mediterranean area. A proven diet that’s worked countless people thousands of years.

This diet isn’t just about lean calories intake. It’s about clean eating. Fruits and veggies are full of healthy fats and fibers. Whole grains are fantastic for your digestive system. Poultry is very low fat compared to red meats. And fish is a fantastic source of vitamins like omega 3.  

For some, it might sound all too good to be true. So the downside? This diet requires a little bit of regular exercise. No heavy weight lifting, more so average cardio. It also requires some picky eating.

7 Scary Junk Food Side Effects | Eat This Not That
Photo by www.eatthis.com

Foods with these ingredients should be avoided right away

  • Sodas, candies, ice cream, and other sugary processed foods
  • White bread, pasta made from refined wheat
  • Soybean oil, canola oil, cottonseed oil 
  • Processed sausages, hot dogs, and similar products 

There you have it, the “fad” diet that actually works. Yes, it requires work, but it’s not something tedious like a juice cleanse. The foods in the Mediterranian diet are everyday flavors you’re used to, just leaner. But as always, portions are everything, and processed sugar stuff is a no-go. If you need help making this diet happen in your everyday life, we got you covered. We have everything this diet requires and then some. Click here to learn more.

Flounder Francese with Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Sources:

www.healthline.com

www.mayoclinic.org

Foods that are Great for your Brain Health

Brain Food

You hear a lot about heart-healthy foods, immune system boosters, and snacks that supercharge your gut. But, the one we seem to hear about rarely is about these days “brain food.” If you’ve been keeping up with our blog, you know that you are what you eat by now. Your diet often defines your overall health, and that includes your brain. Believe it or not, the nutrients in certain foods can boost your cognitive abilities and brain functions over time. Keep reading to find out what those foods are!

Leafy Vegetables

The first stop on our list is leafy veggies. These leafy greens are already associated with healthy diets. Yes, these veggies make a great addition to any diet when you’re trying to lose weight, but the benefits go beyond weight loss. What are the leafy veggies in mention? Kale, spinach, collards, and broccoli. These veggies are rich in brain-boosting nutrients such as vitamin K, lutein, folate, and beta carotene. There is research that suggests that these leafy foods may patiently slow cognitive decline. Keep that in mind when you’re putting together a salad or putting together a vegetable medley.

Whole Grains

Last on our list is whole grains. Whole grains such as bread, pasta, barley, brown rice, oatmeal, and bulgur wheat are full of vitamin E. Your body uses vitamin E to protect and preserve healthy cells. By doing so, protects brain function and prevents neurodegeneration. Swap out your processed grains for some whole ones and aim to fit more oatmeal into your morning breakfast routine, along with some vitamin B-filled eggs, of course. 

Fatty Fish 

At this point, fatty fish is a Nutropia blog regular. We’ve discussed its benefits in several of our articles already, like the one we released last month, Foods That Help Inflammation in the Body. Fatty fish like herring, lake trout, and salmon are full of omega-3 fatty acids and unsaturated fats that have been linked to lowering blood levels of beta-amyloid. For those who don’t know, beta-amyloid is a protein that forms harmful clumps in the brain. This occurrence is linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Now that’s one powerful food and yet another reason to add fatty fish to your diet. If your not a fish fan, all is well. Try adding an omega-3 supplement to your morning routine, or try adding other omega-3 sources such as flaxseeds, avocados, and walnuts to your diet. Speaking of walnuts…

Walnuts

All nuts are fantastic sources of protein, full of healthy fats and more. But what you probably don’t know is one nut, in particular, may improve memory. That nut in question is walnuts. Like fatty fish, walnuts are full of omega-3, but they contain fatty acids called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Diets full of rich ALA and other omega-3 fatty acids are linked to lower blood pressure and cleaner arteries. That’s a win for heart health and brain health. All the more reason why you should include walnuts in your snack time.

Eggs

Everyone loves breakfast. It’s the most important meal of the day, as they say. Eggs are an essential part of breakfast and a brain-healthy diet. Eggs are full of B vitamins. B vitamins are proven to slow cognitive decline. Plus, vitamin B deficiencies have been associated with depression and even dementia. That brings the most important meal of the day to a whole new level.

There you have it! Fill your diet with these healthy brain foods to boost your brain health. Eating foods with the proper nutrients simply fortifies your cognitive function over time. It’s not like you’ll eat a handful of walnuts and automatically remember every. That’s not the cause! Are you having trouble fitting the proper nutrients into your diet? We just so happen to specialize in that. Click here to learn more. 

Sources

health.harvard.edu

premierneurologycenter.com

Foods That Help Inflammation in the Body

We’ve all heard it before, you are what you eat. There are so many truths to that statement, a few of which we’ve already covered such as gut health. But how else can your diet affect your body, other than your digestive system? The answer may take you by surprise. Inflammation.

What is Inflammation?  

Inflammation is what happens when your body sends white blood cells out to protect you from outside invaders, such as bacteria and viruses. For example, when you get bit by a mosquito, white blood cells rush to the site of the bit to protect the body from any further damage or infection. As a result, around, red, itchy bump forms around the bit. That bump is inflammation. Sometimes the body sends white blood cells to defend tissues in distress against invaders that aren’t there. Obviously, that can become problematic fast. The result is pain, redness, swelling, and general discomfort in a given area of the body. That inflammation can be caused by an injury, tissue irritation, or even disease. 

You’re probably familiar with muscle stiffness, swelling, and joint pain. These are basic examples of acute inflammation. It’s short-term, meaning it eventually goes away. But then there are diseases like arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, and asthma. The discomfort these afflictions cause are examples of chronic inflammation, aka long-term inflammation that doesn’t go away without some level of treatment. 

You’re probably aware that the previously mentioned diseases are relatively easily treated. In fact, they’re very common and you may even live with one. What you may not know is that inflammation, acute or chronic, can be affected by your daily diet, for the better or the worst. In fact, what may blow your mind, even more, is that you probably have few items in your pantry that, if added to your diet, would help reduce any lingering inflammation in your body. 

Turmeric 

Turmeric is said to reduce inflammation related to diseases like arthritis and diabetes. It has a nutrient in it called curcumin. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory effects and is a powerful antioxidant. Turmeric itself is a common spice used in Indian dishes like curry. If you’re an adventurous cook, the benefits of turmeric should give you a good excuse to venture into Indian cuisine.  

Olive Oil

Olive oil is a pretty common cooking oil and chances are, you have a bottle of it sitting in your kitchen right now. This oil isn’t just a kitchen staple. It’s a key player in any anti-inflammatory diet. Olive oil is said to reduce inflammation due to it’s full of an antioxidant by the name of oleocanthal. Oleocanthal happens to work similarly to ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug we’re all familiar with. After hearing that you may have a better appreciation of olive oil. The benefits it brings to the table, along with the flavor, justifies incorporating it into your meals when possible.  

Fatty Fish

Fish oil is a very common supplement you can find at just about every drug store. The taste it leaves in your mouth might be off-putting, but it’s worth it. Fish oil is full of Omega-3s, which are beneficial for many reasons, one of those reasons being inflammation reduction. Omega-3s can reduce the production of certain substances released during your body’s

inflammatory response. Supplements aside, those same omega-3s can be found in fatty fish like herring, lake trout, and salmon. That’s why fish is the ideal protein source in an anti-inflammatory diet. You can buy some at your local grocery store or better yet, a fresh fish market. 

Dark Chocolate

Now we go from fish to chocolate. What a transition! Everyone loves chocolate. Luckily, chocolate of the dark variety is full of fantastic benefits besides making your taste buds dance. Like olive oil, dark chocolate has antioxidants in it that reduce inflammation. It’s known for helping to reduce inflammation pertaining to the circulatory system, primarily arteries. So now you have an excuse to snack on a little chocolate every now and then. But a friendly reminder, dark chocolate isn’t dark chocolate unless it’s made from 70% cocoa or more. Otherwise, you’ll miss out on all those anti-inflammatory antioxidants. 

Foods Known to Cause Inflammation

Some foods can help, others can make things worse if not cause inflammation outright. This food will definitely not surprise you as they’re already notorious for being generally unhealthy.

AVOID the following food types if you’re trying to establish an anti-inflammatory diet: 

  • fast food
  • Refined carbohydrates 
  • Fried foods
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages
  • Processed meats
  • Trans fats

There you have it. A few simple foods that can help you start your journey towards establishing an anti-inflammatory diet. Plus, you know a few to avoid as well. Whether you’re trying to mitigate the inflammation your body struggles with or not, it is important to consider the long-term benefits an anti-inflammatory heavy diet can have for you. After all, inflammation is a big indicator of disease and overall health. 

Do you need help making better dietary choices? We can help you with that. Nutropia creates personalized meals and snacks fit to meet each individual’s dietary needs and favorite flavors. Click here to learn more.

Sources:

www.webmd.com/arthritis/about-inflammation

www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-proven-benefits-of-olive-oil#TOC_TITLE_HDR_4

www.healthline.com/nutrition/13-anti-inflammatory-foods#TOC_TITLE_HDR_12

www.healthline.com/nutrition/17-health-benefits-of-omega-3#TOC_TITLE_HDR_5

Produce in-Season Spring 2021!

Fresh

If you eat many fruits and veggies, you’re probably familiar with the even flow of produce prices and quality. That’s why buying produce in season is cost-effective and efficient. Naturally, produce is at its finest when it’s fresh but it’s even better when it’s in season. With spring on the way, let’s look at what produce is coming into season in spring 2021.

March

Photo by  © John Kernick

Spring starts in March, which means that’s when the first round of fresh in-season fruits and veggies begin hitting grocery store shelves. What are some of those fruits and veggies? Artichokes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, lettuce, mushrooms, and radishes. The veggies alone make for one great in-season grilled vegetable medley. Try tossing some artichokes, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and mushrooms in olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Then pop them in the oven at 400 degrees until they’re cooked to your liking. You can also throw together a great side salad with fresh lettuce and a little bit of chopped-up radish. Check out more produce in season by reading the list below.

  • Artichokes
  • Broccoli,
  • Brussels sprouts,
  • Cauliflower
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Parsnips
  • Pineapples
  • Radishes
  • Rutabagas
  • Turnips

April

Photo by eatthegains.com

On to April. April is the first full month of springtime, and it brings even more fresh produce with it. As the season goes on, the produce on the list above keeps getting fresher and fresher while other fruits and vegetables join the party. April marks the growing season for asparagus, rhubarb, spring peas, and more. Grilled asparagus goes great with baked chicken, steak, and salmon. Try tossing some asparagus in olive oil, salt, and pepper and then throwing them on the grill! Maybe bake some spring peas while you’re at it? Or even whip up a nice rhubarb pie! Read the list below to find out what else is in season.

  • Avocado
  • Asparagus
  • Rhubarb
  • Spring peas
  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet potato

May

Photo by tasteofhome.com

May is the last full month of spring, which means we see even more fresh fruits and veggies hit the grocery store shelves. May sees more fruits come into season, with apricots, cherries, mangoes, and strawberries making an appearance. Enjoy an excellent strawberry parfait, cook up a nice apricot cobbler, eat a fresh mango for lunch, or toss a fresh, plump cherry on top of your ice cream sundae, if you want to be a little extra. What else comes into season? Read the list below

  • Apricots
  • Cherries
  • Mangoes
  • Okra
  • Strawberries
  • Swiss chard
  • Zucchini

June

Photo by myrecipes.com

Last but not least, June. May was the beginning of the fresh fruit season, but June brings in the heavy hitters, with blueberries, raspberries, kiwi, peaches, and the summertime classic, watermelon. This is a great time to put together a banger fruit salad, bake up some tasty blueberry muffins for breakfast, peel up some peaches for a nice peach cobbler, and cut up some watermelon for the kids on their first day of summer break. The list doesn’t end there. There’s more where that comes from. Read below!

  • Blueberries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Kiwi
  • Peaches
  • Watermelon
  • Black cherry
  • Mulberry
  • Loquat
  • Pearplum
  • Nectarine
  • Raspberry
  • Currant
  • Gooseberry

There you have it! Save some money at the grocery store by buying these tasty fruits and vegetables when they are as fresh as can be. At Nutropia, we regularly cook with the freshest produce and ingredients in season. If you’re not a fan of cooking, we can cook up some fresh, healthy meals and snacks just for you! Click here to learn more.

Sources:

thespruceeats.com

cookieandkate.com

3 Healthy Soups to Help you Stay Warm This Winter

There’s nothing quite like a nice bowl of hot soup on a cold winter day. Soup is savory, warming, and, when done right, healthy. Yes, cheesy potato soup tastes fantastic, especially with bacon bits on top. But there’s no denying the fact that it’s not great for you or your diet. When you create a soup full of veggies, lean cuts of meat, and wholesome ingredients, you get yourself one healthy meal fit for cozying up next to the fireplace. Here are 3 healthy soups you can make to stay warm and faithful to your diet this winter.

Vegetable Soup

The name says it all. Vegetable soup is made of the very thing you probably don’t eat enough of. The average vegetable soup consists of onions, celery, carrots, and sometimes tomatoes. This soup helps you get a serving of vegetables and stay warm at the same time. Click here for a simple recipe.

Butternut squash 

If you have a sweet tooth, this soup is for you. Butternut squash is low-calorie and a great source of fiber. So naturally, it’s food fit to be the main ingredient in a healthy soup. However, the average run-of-the-mill soup is full of heavy cream and other fatty ingredients. But like many meals, alternatives make it more nutritious. You can make a nice butternut squash soup with onion, carrots, garlic, and vegetable stock. Click here for a recipe.

Chicken noodle soup

Last but not least, the one and only chicken soup. This soup is a classic. It’s reasonably healthy, even if it’s store-bought. But you can step up this dish’s health game with just a few different ingredients. For one, white chicken breast is key to dropping the calorie count in this soup. Of course, the veggies, onion, celery, carrot, and garlic, are a must-have. What makes this dish different is the healthy seasonings involved. Tumeric and bay leaves invite more nutrients to the party. To top it all off, a nice squeeze of lemon juice for an extra dose of vitamin C. Try it for yourself! Click here to read the recipe.

Nutropia Spicy chicken tortilla soup

Now you know which soup to fill your bowl full with. These soups are tasty and great for those of us on a low-calorie diet. Of course, portions are everything. Too much soup means too many calories. So keep that in mind when you cook up and dig into these fine soups. You can also get a nice warm meal pre-portioned and perfectly seasoned delivered straight to your door. We provide delicious healthy, fit foods all around the NYC area. Click here to learn more! 

Sources:

  • allthehealthythings.com
  • healthline.com
  • inspiredtaste.net
  • thecleaneatingcouple.com

Three Easy Healthy New Year’s Resolutions You Can Keep

We’ve all been there before. You make a promise to yourself on New Years’. “I’m going to be healthier this year,” you think. But one way or another, that promise never seems to hold up. Without the right know-how, changing the way you eat and the way you treat your body can be a bit of a struggle. But with a few easy tricks, you can make it happen. If you’ve been keeping up with our blog posts, you might remember a few of the hints and tricks we’ve shared about how to achieve a healthier diet. Here are 3 of our many suggestions you can use to keep your 2021 New Year’s resolution.

Portion Sizes

Portions are everything. After all, how much you eat correlates to your calorie intake. When you have a big plate, filling it up is your first instinct. At that point, what you’re eating doesn’t matter that much. Too much of a good thing is a bad thing. It’s as simple as that. An easy solution? Use a smaller plate. You can fill it up with healthy foods and never feel guilty about it. It’s the easiest way to cut your calorie intake and keep a steady diet casually.

Greens in every meal!

Veggies are full of vitamins that are great for your body. It’s fair to say most people prefer not to eat them, though. That’s why we tend to avoid them when possible. However, we all know eating the green stuff is ideal when you’re on a diet. So how can you fit them into your daily diet without making yourself miserable? Try to have some veggies in every meal. Add some peppers and onions to your omelet. Have a side salad instead of fries when you go out to lunch. Cook up some asparagus alongside the hamburgers when you have a grill out for dinner. This option takes a little effort, but it’s easier than eating a salad for every meal.

Healthy alternatives

The little things make significant differences over time. That’s sort of the running theme for this blog post. Fried snacks and foods taste amazing, but they aren’t great for you or your diet. Alternatives are the answer. Instead of salt and vinegar potato chips, go for reduced-fat chips or pretzels. Get a grilled chicken sandwich instead of a fried one. I think you get the idea!

So there you have it. Three easy ways you can keep your simple new year’s resolution. Of course, changing your diet takes time and patience. Nothing happens overnight! If you happen to live in the NYC area, we can help you achieve your healthy diet goals without breaking a sweat. We deliver a variety of healthy portioned meals and snacks straight to your door. Click here to learn more!

Tips For Keeping Your Gut Healthy

You are what you eat. We’ve all heard it before. We all know that what we eat affects our bodies. The foods we consume have nutrients in them and eating the right ones helps the body function at its best. But have you ever thought about how what you eat affects your gut? Stomach health is the real deal. Your gut’s health contributes to your metabolism, your ability to take in nutrients, and well, your ability to eat. Bloating, indigestion, heartburn, and nausea are absolutely horrible. When your gut’s not having a good time you can’t eat your favorite meals. There are a few different things you can do to keep your gut healthy and avoid any unnecessary hardship. Here are a few helpful tips to keep your gut happy.

Apple Cider Vinegar

The benefits of apple cider vinegar, according to a dietitian
Natalia Klenova / Getty Images

You’ve probably heard of this one before. One shot of apple cider vinegar a day helps your waistline. Yes, it comes in handy if you’re trying to lose weight, but it does your gut a big favor by helping it maintain healthy acid levels. Healthy acid levels mean less acid issues, aka reflux, heartburn, and indigestion. If you have GERD, this is a good habit you should add to your routine. Bonus points. This stuff is also great for your heart and heart health, as we all know, is incredibly important. 

Pro-biotics

Pro-biotics are the tiny bacteria that do that heavy lifting when it comes to GI health. They’re known as the “good” bacteria for a good reason. It helps the body move along food throw the digestive tract from start to finish. Probiotics help keep the important enzymes in line, which helps keep the stomach and intestines running smoothly. You can get probiotics in supplements, yogurt, kombucha, and more. Just do a little search and find out which method works best for you.

Small bits

The phrase “chew your food before you swallow” doesn’t just apply to choking. You have teeth for a reason so use them! Big pieces of food can make digestion harder than it has to be for the body. When you eat too fast and too much at once in one sitting, your body’s enzymes can’t keep up. Well chewed food is good for digestion, esophagus health, and even your metabolism. So chew that food. Don’t gulp it all whole!  

Alkaline Rich Foods

This may not be one you’re familiar with. Alkaline means pH level over 7. By now, you’ve probably noticed that acidy is a pretty big deal when it comes to gut health. It’s the same premise as apple cider vinegar. The stuff helps the gut maintain its pH level. Tons of veggies are full of alkaline. Yet another reason why you should eat your vegetables! Leafy greens, broccoli, fresh fruits, and ginger are rich with alkaline and all its glory. These foods can help you fend against acid reflux and heartburn. Nobody whats to deal with those acid issues. So eat your fresh fruits and veggies.  

Take it Easy on the Fried stuff

Last but not least, the obvious one. Fried foods. They’re full of fat and grease. Does fried food taste great? It sure does. But does your body actually need it? No, in fact, it hates it.  Fatty fried foods prevent the lower esophageal sphincter from fully tightening, which leads to dreadful heartburn and acid reflux. If you have acid issues, avoid fried stuff entirely. Go for grilled, not fried or else your stomach will make you pay for it. 

Stomach health seems like a complicated thing but the truth is, eating correctly and developing the right habits can keep it happy and make mealtime easier on you. Get your veggies in small bites, drink some apple cider vinegar, and avoid fried food like the plague if you have gut issues. Your stomach is important. So take care of it and fill it with the right stuff. If you need a little help eating the right stuff, we can lend you a hand. Click here to learn more.

Sources:  

asweetpeachef.com

healthline.com

ndtv.com

everydayhealth.com

3 Healthy Produce In-season During Fall

It’s fall! Believe it or not, it’s more than just pumpkin season. In fact, there are plenty of fruits and veggies in season during this time of the year. We’re not talking about apples either! Here are 3 tasty in-season produce you can cook a healthy seasonal meal with.

Sweet Potatoes

If you haven’t had sweet potatoes, you’re missing out! These spuds are delicious, nutritious, and in season. Replace your regular Yukon golds with some healthy sweet potatoes. Enjoy your burger with a tasty side of sweet potato fries or chips. These spuds are so sweet, they’re practically dessert. Try baking a nice sweet potato casserole. Be mindful of what you put in it though. After all, healthy foods are only as healthy as what you serve them with!

Winter Squash

Just because it’s fall doesn’t mean winter squash can’t be in season! Squash is one of those foods that tastes just like what you cook it with. It takes on the flavors of the spices you cook it with, so it’s not too difficult to work within the kitchen. Bake it alongside your favorite veggies or try your hand at squash soup and even squash spaghetti noodles.

Spinach

Spinach, arugula, shredded chicken and more!

Last but not least, spinach. This tasty leaf makes a great salad. You can toss it in with arugula or any other leaf of your choice. Pick out your favorite dressing and toppings to make a great, nutrient-filled salad.

One of our delicious Nutropia salads with chicken, mixed greens and more!

Keep this list in mind next time you’re in the produce section at the grocery store. These seasonal fall foods are good for you and great for dinner time. But if you’re not the biggest fan of cooking, we got you covered. We use all the foods on this list and more in our tasty meals and snacks. Click here to learn more.