Tag Archives: meal plans

How to stay healthy when you are busy.

Nowadays, many people are so consumed with work that they neglect their diet and health. Many people feel that they no longer have the time or money to buy ingredients to cook a wholesome meal that meets their energy and nutritional requirements. However, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, kidney stones, and chronic fatigue syndrome are some things that await you if you don’t mend your diet and nutrition ways. Also, the key to maintaining good performance and productivity at work is balanced and healthy meals every day. You need to consume the right amount of calories and servings of essential vitamins. How can you pull it off even if you’re a busy person?

1. Determine your daily calorie intake

The USDA’s average calorie intake recommendations and calorie calculators only serve as general guides and estimates. However, each person’s body and level of activity differs, which means the actual calories that each person needs may vary. Ageing, changes in lifestyle or jobs, and metabolism also cause your daily calorie intake to evolve. If you want to have a more informed idea of how many calories you will need, set an appointment with a nutritionist.

2. Keep track of what you eat

If you aim to trim inches off your waist or sugar from your diet, you need to monitor your eating habits. To track what you are eating, all you need is a pen and notebook (or a meal tracking app). Write down what you ate during the day, the amount of food you ate, and the time you ate a particular food item. For instance, you can write:

August 19, Monday

Three pieces of apple for breakfast (6:30 AM)
one plate of baked salmon with sweet potatoes (12:00 PM)
CHEAT – glazed doughnut for snacks (4:00 PM),
4 oz steak with rice for dinner (8:00 PM)
grapes for a midnight snack (12:00 AM)

Note the meals you eat for at least a week or two. Then, you can bring these data with you when you consult with your nutritionist. Your nutritionist would likely ask you of the level of activeness you have, which they would then compare to your week-long data. Your nutritionist would then contrast the amount and types of food you eat versus your other body, health, and activity data. From their observations and calorie calculations, your nutritionist can make specific recommendations as to the amount and types of food that you need to reduce. They may also tell you the vitamins and minerals you lack in your body.

3. Plan your meals

Based on your nutritionists’ recommendations, design a weekly meal plan that you have to follow. Included in the meal plan are:

Your budget
Your menu for the whole week
The days and times of the week to go shopping for ingredients

For example, if your nutritionist tells you to cut back on sweets, you can buy fruits such as bananas or blueberries, which are rich in potassium and Vitamin C, respectively. These fruits can serve as substitutes for carbs-rich pastries and candies. You can also use a blender to make fruit shakes (but don’t add any sugar!) as an alternative to sodas. Fruits are easy to buy and prepare. You can store them in the freezer and take them out as needed in your meal plan. You only need to set aside an hour or two of your Saturdays or Sundays to create a meal plan.

4. Prepare and store your meals ahead

You have refrigerators and microwave ovens that you can use to prepare healthy meals your nutritionist recommended. You can also store your food in resealable packs or containers that you can grab and go. Use your meal plan as a guide to the foods you need to prepare and store in advance. This would ensure that your dietary requirements are still met, even though you are busy.

No matter how busy you may get with work, you must never neglect your health. Follow the tips above to maintain a healthy and balanced diet.

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What to Know About Personalized Meal Plans.

There is no one size fits all scheme when it comes to weight loss plans. While the government issues nutrition standards for a healthy diet, these standards only refer to average values. Your personal needs may go above or beyond these standards since not everyone has the same body. This is why off-the-shelf weight loss plans may not yield the results you want.

Understand what causes weight gain

To have a more realistic and practical view of weight gain, you need to understand how everyone’s bodies are different. You may respond to stress by overeating, while others smoke. Both habits can contribute to weight gain. Lack of time can also lead you to make bad choices in terms of food, such as eating fast food with high calories. What you need is to sit down and plan your meals so that you have something to stick to whatever happens.

Customize your meal plan

To start a customized meal plan, first, you need to know which food items you should avoid. These include things that are too sweet or too salty, as well as those that trigger any allergies you may have. Next, list down the maximum amount of carbs, salt, and fat you are allowed to have in a day. That means you have to plan the desserts and viands you will have for the coming week.

For example, you may have set your daily maximum carb limit to 200 grams a day to help you shed weight. Others may need to have higher limits, primarily if they metabolize carbohydrates quickly. That’s because cutting too many carbs out of your diet can harm your health, as your body still needs them as fuel. Include more green leafy vegetables, nuts, fish, and whole grains in your weekly menu.

A nutritionist can help you in your meal plan

Your maximum personal carb, salt, and fat intake is something you can’t accurately calculate by yourself. You will need the guidance of a clinical nutritionist. They will ask you to undergo a few medical exams, such as a blood sugar test so that they will know what affects your body’s metabolism. For instance, you might discover in those tests that you have a genetic predisposition towards slow metabolism. While there’s nothing you can do about your DNA, your nutritionist can still devise a meal plan appropriate to your genes.

Abrupt changes in your daily diet can adversely impact your mood and physical state during the first few days. Your nutritionist may recommend a more gradual transition so that your body can adjust to the changes more smoothly. Including a transition phase in your meal plan can also decrease the chances of relapse, or your failure to stick to your daily carbohydrates, salt, and fat intake limits.

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